26 Years of Honoring & Remembering
100th Anniversary of WWI

Scheduled Display Aircraft for 2014

(Additional display aircraft will be added as confirmed)



Supermarine
Seafire Mk. XV

PV-2
Harpoon

JN-4
Jenny

TBM
Avenger

T-6
Texan

C1-A
Trader

P-51D
Mustang

PT-17
Kaydet

T-6
Texan

SIAI-Marchetti
SM.1019

L4 / O-59
Grasshopper

L3 / O-58
Grasshopper

Nieuport
11

Morane
Saulnier "L"

Nieuport
11

Nieuport
16

Nieuport
16

Fokker
DR1 Triplane

Curtiss MF
Seagull

Spad
S.VII

Nieuport
28

Eindecker
E III

Siemens-
Schukert D1

Fokker
D.VII

Fokker
D.VII

RAF
S.E.5

Nieuport
11

Nieuport
28

SPAD
Replica

WWI
Ambulance

Ferret
Armored Car

 

Supermarine Seafire Mk. XV (very rare)            Top of Page

This airplane is one of only four known Seafire Mk. XVs to exist in the world and it may be the only flying Supermarine Seafire Mk. XV in the world.  Dr. Wes Stricker's immaculate Supermarine Seafire Mk. XV (also known as the "hooked Spitfire") is based in Columbia, MO, was restored by Jim Cooper, and made its first post-restoration flight in 2010.  The Supermarine Seafire was a naval version of the Supermarine Spitfire specially adapted for operation from aircraft carriers.  The Seafire's mission was primarily as a short range interceptor.
Wing span: 36ft 10in.  Max takeoff weight: 7,640 lb.  Max speed: 359 mph.   Power: 1,850 hp.

 

Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon "Attu Warrior"                    visit their websiteTop of Page

This rare PV-2 Harpoon was built by Lockheed in 1945 . It was used by the Navy until the end of 1956 and then was used in various roles as an insect sprayer. Finally, after sitting derelict for 20 years, it was purchased by Dave Hansen in 2006 and restored to wartime condition. Today, named "Attu Warrior" in honor of all the servicemen who were stationed in the Aleutian Islands, a place from where PV-2’s flew many missions, this beautifully restored warbird is one of the very few still flying in the world. The Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon was built for the reconnaissance role. It was powered by two Pratt & Whitney R-2800-31 air-cooled radial engines rated at 2,000 horsepower for take-off, and 1,600 horsepower at 11,900 feet. Its max speed at 13,700 feet was 282 mph., at sea level 271 mph and its cruising speed was recorded at 171 mph. The Harpoon’s climbing rate was 1,630 feet per minute, and her service ceiling was 23,900 feet. It weighed in at 21,028 lbs. with 36,000 lbs. being her maximum. The PV-2 Harpoon was a redesign of the PV-1 Ventura which in turn was very similar to its predecessor the Hudson. The US Army Air Force placed its order for the Ventura Mark IIA’s and put them in service as B-34 Lexington’s (later redesignated RB-34).
Max takeoff weight: 36,000 lb. Max speed: 282 mph.

 

1917 Curtiss JN-4 "Jenny"                   visit their websiteTop of Page

In honor of the 100th anniversary of WWI, Salute To Veterans is proud to host a "Jenny".   This JN-4 Jenny is based in Bowling Green, KY and was built by filmmaker Dorian Walker who obtained the design specs for an original 1917 airplane.  It is operated by Friends of Jenny (FOJ), a non-profit organization formed to educate the public about the first mass-produced airplane.  Besides being used a as WWI flight trainer, the Jenny carried the first regularly-scheduled air mail.  In fact, this FOJ plane bears the same tail number (38262) as the plane that carried the first U.S. Mail from Washington, D.C. to New York on May 15, 1918.  FOJ consists of an all-volunteer group of aviators and aviation aficionados who work diligently to maintain and fly this unique aircraft to bring to life the educational significance of the Curtiss JN-4 Jenny biplane.
Loaded weight: 1,920 lb. Max speed: 75 mph. Horsepower: 90 hp.

 

TBM (Torpedo Bomber Martin) Avenger                    visit their websiteTop of Page
TBMAvenger_2014_5.jpg (32765 bytes)
The Grumman TBM Avenger (designated TBM for aircraft manufactured by General Motors) was a torpedo bomber developed initially for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, and eventually used by several air or naval arms around the world. It entered U.S. service in 1942, It remained in service to become one of the outstanding torpedo bombers of World War II. Greatly modified after the war, it remained in use until the 1960s. The plane is flown by John Lohmar.
Loaded weight: 17,893 lb. Max speed: 275 mph.

 

T-6 "Radial Velocity" Reno Racing Plane                    visit their websiteTop of Page

"Radial Velocity" is a WWII T-6 trainer owned and flown by John Lohmar of St. Louis, MO, based at Creve Coeur Airport. They have raced the past six years in the fastest motor sport on earth - The Reno Air Races. Radial Velocity missed 2nd place by only 1 second in the 2013 Reno Races.  The North American T-6 Texan was a single-engine advanced trainer aircraft used to train pilots of the United States Army Air Forces, United States Navy, Royal Air Force and other air forces of the British Commonwealth during World War II and into the 1950s. The T-6 is known by a variety of designations depending on the model and operating air force. The USAAC designated it as the AT-6, the United States Navy the SNJ, and British Commonwealth air forces, the Harvard, the name it is best known by outside of the United States. It remains a popular warbird aircraft. This aircraft is owned and flown by John Lohmar of St. Louis MO, based at Creve Coeur Airport.
Wingspan: 42 ft.  Loaded weight: 5,617 lb. Max speed: 222 mph.

 

Grumman C1-A Trader "Miss Belle"  (1958)    Top of Page          visit their website

"Miss Belle" is a rare example of a flying C1-A "Trader" that took 10 years of dedicated restoration efforts.  She had a 30 year career in the US Navy traveling the globe, amassing nearly 16,000 Flying Hours with over 800 arrested landings and 190 carrier catapult launches.  C1-A Traders were used  throughout the 1960s and 1970s carrying mail and supplies to aircraft carriers on station in the Pacific Ocean during the Vietnam War, and also served as a trainer for all-weather carrier operations.  Acquired in 1999 by Doug Goss (Chief Pilot) and Richard Cronn, this C1-A brings back memories for Vietnam era Navy Veterans and shows the magic of her enormous folding wings.  "Miss Belle" comes to us from Trader Air, Inc. located in Topeka KS.
Max weight: 24,500 lb. Max speed: 345 mph.

 

North American P51 Mustang "Archie"      Top of Page

"Archie" is a beautiful example of a North American P-51 Mustang long-range fighter and escort, owned by "Captain" Lee Maples, Vichy, MO. Initially P-51's were built with an Allison engine and the fighter handled well at low altitudes but exhibited lackluster performance over 15,000 feet. Over time, many of the P-51s were sold to Britain, who also found it inadequate at altitude. Rolls-Royce was invited to review the aircraft, and the result was legendary: with the Rolls-Royce 61 engine, the fighter could reach 433 mph at 20,000 feet, with an absolute ceiling of 40,300 feet. This combination catapulted the Mustang to near-mythic status, which continues today.
Loaded weight: 9,200 lb. Max speed: 437 mph.

 

Stearman PT-17 Kaydet           Top of Page

Originally designated the X-70, the Stearman PT-17 was designed in 1933 to meet the US Air Corps requirements for a new trainer. Over 10,000 Kaydet's of different variants were ultimately built. This particular Kaydet was built in 1942 and used as a trainer in the Royal Canadian Air Force until 1944, at which time it was returned to the US Army Air Corps. It was mustered out in 1945, after which it spent the next 20+ years towing advertising banners over Cape May, NJ.  Rod Hightower obtained this PT-17 as a "basket case" and in 1990 began a 7-year restoration.
Max takeoff weight: 2,635 lb. Maximum speed: 135 mph.

 

North American T-6 Texan          Top of Page
Aircraft_T-6_Dr_Stricker_4a.jpg (49509 bytes)
The North American Aviation T-6 Texan was a single-engine advanced trainer aircraft used to train pilots of the United States Army Air Forces , United States Navy , Royal Air Force and other air forces of the British Commonwealth during World War II and into the 1950s. Designed by North American Aviation , the T-6 is known by a variety of designations depending on the model and operating air force. The USAAC and USAAF designated it as the AT-6, the United States Navy the SNJ, and British Commonwealth air forces, the Harvard, the name it is best known by outside of the US. After 1962, US forces designated it the T-6. It remains a popular warbird aircraft used for airshow demonstrations and static displays.  This T-6 is owned and flown by Dr. Wes Stricker based in Columbia, MO.
Wingspan: 42 ft. Loaded weight: 5,617lb. Power: 600 hp. Maximum speed: 208 mph.

 

SIAI-Marchetti SM.1019 "Italian Bird Dog"          Top of Page
Aircraft_Italian_Birddog_4a.jpg (24100 bytes)
The SIAI-Marchetti SM.1019 was an Italian STOL (Short TakeOff and Landing) liaison monoplane built by SIAI-Marchetti for the Italian Army and based on the O-1 Bird Dog. To meet an Italian Army requirement for a short take-off liaison aircraft, SIAI-Marchetti modified the design of the Cessna 305A/O-1 Bird Dog with a new turboprop engine and a revised tail unit. The prototype first flew on 24 May 1969 powered by a 317hp (236kW) Allison 250-B15C turboprop engine. It was evaluated against the Aermacchi AM.3 and was successful and won a production order for 80 aircraft.  This SIAI-Marchetti SM.1019 is owned and flown by Dr. Wes Stricker based in Columbia, MO.
Wingspan: 36 ft.  Gross Weight: 3,196 lbs.  Power: 400 hp (turboprop).   Maximum Speed: 177 mph.

 

Piper L4 "Grasshopper" (1945)                  visit their websiteTop of Page
Aircraft_L4_4a.jpg (22527 bytes)
Piper L4 (O-59) "Grasshopper" Observation/Liaison aircraft (military version of the J3 Cub). The L4 was manufactured by Piper Aircraft for the U.S. Army Air Force (USAAF) for liaison and artillery spotter/director duties. It became one of the most popular of the light "Grasshopper" class of liaison aircraft and was also was heavily used for the initial phase of pilot training. This specific aircraft was built in 1945 as an L-4J in olive drab colors and delivered to the Army Air Corps. It was transferred from the military to a civilian registration in 1956, however it still displays it's military heritage in olive drab paint and D-Day invasion stripes.  This aircraft is owned and flown by Mark Pierce of the Kansas City Dawn Patrol.
Wingspan: 35' 3". Empty weight: 765 lbs. Max. takeoff weight: 1,220 lbs. Power: 65hp. Cruise speed: 75mph. Horsepower: 65 hp.

 

Aeronca L-3 Grasshopper "LIL' Show Me" (1941)          visit their websiteTop of Page
2014_L3_4.jpg (21991 bytes)
The Aeronca L-3 (originally designated O-58) was used as an observation, liaison, and training aircraft by the United States Army Air Corps in World War II. This particular Aeronca L-3E was made in Glendale, California in 1941. It was manufactured as a civilian Model 65TAC Defender but spent the war time years at Meacham Field in Fort Worth TX, likely serving as a primary trainer. For the next 40 years this L-3 found itself bouncing around Texas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and finally in Missouri all while having changed owners 28 times. In October 1981, the Missouri Wing of the Commemorative Air Force took ownership and restored it's current pristine condition.
Empty weight: 835 lb. Cruise speed: 79 mph. Horsepower: 65 hp.

 

Nieuport 11 (replica)                   visit their websiteTop of Page                (Dick Starks)

Introduced in 1916, the Nieuport 11 was an extremely successful French-built WW I fighter. It was flown by the French, British, and Russian armed forces. Dicks' is painted in the colors of the 1916 Lafayette Escadrille, the first planes ever flown by American pilots in an organized squadron in WWI. The screaming Sioux Indian head painted on the side of the fuselage adopted by the pilots of the Lafayette Escadrille was the logo from a box of Savage Arms .303 machine gun ammunition. The Lewis 303 drum-fed machine gun mounted on the top wing was there to shoot over the propeller’s arc because at that time, the allies did not have the technology to fire the machine gun through the propeller without hitting the spinning prop. This replica was plans built by aviation author Dick Starks in in conjunction Tom Glaeser's Nieuport in 1984.  It is 7/8 scale and powered with a Volkswagon engine and based in Kansas City.

 

Morane-Saulnier "L" Parasol Fighter (replica)                    visit their websiteTop of Page
Aircraft_Morane_Sharon_3a.jpg (49071 bytes)
This Morane-Saulnier "L" is a scale replica of the first airplane to shoot down a Zeppelin in WW I. The Morane-Saulnier was one of the first successful fighter planes. It was built in both one- and two-seat configurations. It had a forward-facing machine gun that fired through the arc of the propeller, which was armored so as to deflect any shots that struck it. Overall, about 600 were built. Its success triggered a rapid aircraft cycle in several nations, which quickly rendered it obsolete. Interestingly, the first fighter-fighter victory occurred when a German Fokker shot down one of the two-seat versions of the L-series aircraft. This is an Airdrome Airplanes replica and was built and flown by Sharon Starks of Parkville, MO.   This specific aircraft appeared in the movie Amelia. A story about Amelia Earhart.

 

Nieuport 11 (replica)                    visit their websiteTop of Page                (Tom Glaeser)

This Nieuport 11 replica was plans built by Tom Glaeser in conjunction with Dick Starks' Nieuport in 1984 (above).  It is 7/8 scale and powered with a Volkswagon engine.

 

Nieuport 16 (replica)                    visit their websiteTop of Page                (Dave Laur)
Aircraft_Nieuport_11_Laur_3a.jpg (13768 bytes)
The Nieuport 16 was an improved version of the Nieuport 11 with a more powerful engine and the addition of a small headrest behind the cockpit. It was flown by the French, British, and Russian armed forces. Dave's is painted in the colors of the 1916 Lafayette Escadrille, the first planes ever flown by American pilots in an organized squadron in WWI. The Lewis 303 drum-fed machine gun mounted on the top wing was there to shoot over the propeller’s arc because at that time, the allies did not have the technology to fire the machine gun through the propeller without hitting the spinning prop. Dave's plane is also outfitted with replica Le Prieur rockets which were an attempt to shoot down German observation balloons. The rockets were very difficult to aim and flew just about like the bottle rockets of today fly. In other words; all over the place. When the pilots fired the rockets electrically from the cockpit, the results, in the laconic laid-back words of a British pilot, “Were most disconcerting!”  This 7/8 scale replica was plans built by Dick Lemons in 1986.   Based in Kansas City.

 

Nieuport 16 (replica)                    visit their websiteTop of Page                (Mark Pierce)
Aircraft_Nieuport_16_Mark_4a.jpg (34152 bytes)Aircraft_Nieuport_16_Mark_5a.jpg (19067 bytes)
This Nieuport 16 replica was plans built by Mark Pierce in conjunction with Dick Lemons' Nieuport in 1986 (above).  It is 7/8 scale and powered with a Volkswagon engine.

 

Fokker Dr-1 Triplane (replica)                    visit their websiteTop of Page

The Fokker Dr-1 Triplane: Perhaps the most famous fighter of all time. The triplane number 425/17 was the last mount of the 'Red Baron', Rittmeister Manfred Freiherr von Richthofen, the top-scoring ace of World War 1 with 80 confirmed kills. He was shot down on April 21,+ 1918 and the controversy continues to this day as to WHO actually did it. This Volkswagon powered, 75% scale replica was built and flown by Dick Lemons of the Kansas City Dawn Patrol.

 

Curtiss 1918 MF "Seagull" U.S. Navy Coastal Patrol amphibian (replica)          Top of Page
Aircraft_Seagull_4a.jpg (20585 bytes)
The US Navy initially purchased four of these aircraft in addition to the ones that it had already obtained and which was retrofitted to approximately the same design as the others. The US Navy bought another eight aircraft before the end of 1916, but orders in quantity only came following the type's selection as the Navy's standard flying-boat trainer in April 1917. An initial batch of 144 of the basic F model were ordered, followed by 22 MFs in 1918. This replica was built by Harvey Cleveland of Riverside, Missouri. It is painted in the colors of a 1918 U.S. Navy Coastal Patrol bomber/submarine hunter (L. G. F. variant.)

 

SPAD S.VII (replica)Top of Page
Aircraft_Nieuport_28_Ken_4.jpg (23634 bytes)
The Société Provisoire des Aéroplanes Deperdussin (SPAD) designed this aircraft as a WW I fighter. Appearing in 1916, it was first thought to be too heavy and unmaneuverable to be an effective fighter, but as pilots learned its strengths, it became one of the most capable fighters of the war, and one of the most-produced, with 8,472 built and orders for around 10,000 more cancelled at the Armistice. This beautiful replica was built and is flown by Marvin Berk from the Gardner Municipal Airport, home of the annual Gathering of Eagles.

 

Nieuport 28 project (full-scale replica project)Top of Page
Aircraft_Nieuport_28_Ken_4.jpg (23634 bytes)
The Nieuport 28 was a French biplane fighter aircraft flown during World War I. Its principal claim to fame is that it was the first aircraft to see service with an American fighter squadron. It was designed to carry an up-to-date armament of twin synchronized machine guns, had a more powerful engine, and a new wing structure – for the first time a Nieuport biplane was fitted with conventional two spar wings, top and bottom, in place of the sesquiplane "v-strut" layout of earlier Nieuport types. The tail unit’s design closely followed that of the Nieuport 27, but the fuselage was much slimmer, in fact it was so narrow that the machine guns had to be offset to the left. The framework on display shows the modern aluminum construction used in the replicas. The plane is being built by Ken Hines, also known as the "Voice of the Airshow".

 

Fokker Eindecker E III (replica)                  visit their websiteTop of Page
Aircraft_Eindecker_E3_1a.jpg (57757 bytes)Aircraft_Eindecker_E3_4a.jpg (20921 bytes)
The Fokker Eindecker fighters were a series of German World War I monoplane single-seat fighter aircraft designed by Dutch engineer Anthony Fokker.  Developed in April 1915, the first Eindecker (i.e. "Monoplane") was the first purpose-built German fighter aircraft and the first aircraft to be fitted with synchronization gear, enabling the pilot to fire a machine gun through the arc of the propeller without striking the blades.  The Eindecker granted the German Air Service a degree of air superiority from July 1915 until early 1916. This 75% scale replica was refurbished and flown by Dick Lemons of the Kansas City Dawn Patrol.

 

Siemens-Schukert D1 (replica)                    visit their websiteTop of Page
Aircraft_Siemens-Schukert_D1_3a.jpg (51028 bytes)Aircraft_Siemens-Schukert_D1_4a.jpg (19403 bytes)
The Siemens-Schuckert D1 was a German single-seat fighter built by Siemens-Schukert Werke. A number of captured Nieuport 17 fighters were given to German aircraft manufacturers to study, the Siemens-Schukert Werke produced the D1 based on the captured fighter. The D1 was a biplane powered by 110 hp (82 kW) Siemens-Halske Sh1 rotary engine. An order for 150 aircraft for the Imperial German Army Air Service was placed, but these were delayed by late delivery of the complicated geared engine, so that the aircraft was outclassed in combat by newer Allied aircraft when delivered. Only 95 aircraft were produced, most of which were used for training. This 7/8s scale replica is powered by a Volkswagon engine and was built and flown by Marvin Story from the Gardner Municipal Airport, home of the annual Gathering of Eagles.

 

Fokker D.VII (replica)                    visit their websiteTop of Page
Aircraft_Fokker-D7_4a.jpg (30053 bytes)Aircraft_Fokker-D7_Daryl_4a.jpg (21451 bytes)
The Fokker D.VII was a German World War I fighter aircraft designed by Reinhold Platz of the Fokker-Flugzeugwerke. Germany produced around 3,300 D.VII aircraft in the summer and autumn of 1918. In service, the D.VII quickly proved itself to be a formidable aircraft. The plane was so good that is was said to make an average pilot good, a good pilot great and a great pilot invincible. The plane was so effective that the Armistice ending the war specifically required Germany to surrender all D.VIIs to the Allies at the conclusion of hostilities.[1] Surviving aircraft saw continued widespread service with many other countries in the years after World War I. The Fokker D-VII was still in production in 1929 and served in every European air force. This 87% scale replica was built by Darryl Porter.

 

Fokker D.VII (replica) Top of Page
Aircraft_Fokker-D7_3a.jpg (34719 bytes)
This 87% scale Fokker D.VII, built and flown by Mark Hymer, is painted as the aircraft of Oberleutnant Ernst Udet, the second highest German scoring ace of the war and the leading surviving ace.” The D.VII was a German World War I fighter aircraft designed by Reinhold Platz of the Fokker-Flugzeugwerke. Germany produced around 3,300 D.VII aircraft in the summer and autumn of 1918. In service, the D.VII quickly proved itself to be a formidable aircraft. The plane was so good that is was said to make an average pilot good, a good pilot great and a great pilot invincible. The plane was so effective that the Armistice ending the war specifically required Germany to surrender all D.VIIs to the Allies at the conclusion of hostilities.[1] Surviving aircraft saw continued widespread service with many other countries in the years after World War I. The Fokker D-VII was still in production in 1929 and served in every European air force.

 

RAF S.E.5 (replica)                    visit their websiteTop of Page
Aircraft_Fokker-D7_4a.jpg (30053 bytes)
This replica of a Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5 was designed and built by Robert Baslee of Airdrome Aeroplanes located in Holden, MO. The S.E.5 was a British biplane fighter aircraft of the First World War and was known in service as an exceptionally strong aircraft which could be dived at very high speed – the squarer wings also gave much improved lateral control at low airspeeds. It was inherently stable, making it an excellent gunnery platform, but it was also quite manoeverable. It was one of the fastest aircraft of the war at 138 mph, faster than any standard German type of the period.

 

Nieuport 11 (replica)                    visit their websiteTop of Page
Aircraft_Nieuport_11_Givens_4a.jpg (39313 bytes)
Introduced in 1916, the Nieuport 11 was an extremely successful French-built WW I fighter. It was flown by the French, British, and Russian armed forces. Jeff Givens' replica is painted in the colors of the 1916 Lafayette Escadrille.  Nieuport 11s were the first planes ever flown by American pilots in an organized squadron in WWI. The screaming Sioux Indian head painted on the side of the fuselage adopted by the pilots of the Lafayette Escadrille was the logo from a box of Savage Arms .303 machine gun ammunition. The Lewis 303 drum-fed machine gun mounted on the top wing was there to shoot over the propeller’s arc because at that time, the allies did not have the technology to fire the machine gun through the propeller without hitting the spinning prop. This Volkswagon powered, 75% scale replica was built by Jeff Givens from an Airdrome Aeroplanes kit and is based in Basehor Kansas.

 

Nieuport 28 project (full-scale replica project)                    visit their websiteTop of Page
2014_Nieuport28_Gary_5.jpg (33686 bytes)
The Nieuport 28 was a French biplane fighter aircraft flown during World War I. Its principal claim to fame is that it was the first aircraft to see service with an American fighter squadron. It was designed to carry an up-to-date armament of twin synchronized machine guns, had a more powerful engine, and a new wing structure – for the first time a Nieuport biplane was fitted with conventional two spar wings, top and bottom, in place of the sesquiplane "v-strut" layout of earlier Nieuport types. The tail unit’s design closely followed that of the Nieuport 27, but the fuselage was much slimmer, in fact it was so narrow that the machine guns had to be offset to the left. The framework on display shows the modern aluminum construction used in the replicas. The plane is being built by Gary Knight from an Airdrome Aeroplanes kit and is based in Basehor Kansas.

 

SPAD Replica (Wolf Boredom Fighter)Top of Page

The Wolf W-11 Boredom Fighter is a single-seat homebuilt biplane designed to be similar to a WWI SPAD fighter. It is made from wood, has fixed conventional landing gear with a tailskid and is frequently powered by a 65 hp Continental engine.  This aircraft has a 75hp Continental and was built by Jerry Guyer. It is now owned and flown by Alex Trofimoff from Overland Park, KS.

 

 

WWI U.S. Ambulance (replica)Top of Page
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Early in WWI, horse-drawn carriages were used to transport the wounded but were quickly replaced by motor driven carriages. Some French and many American Ambulance Field Service (AAFS) ambulances were based on converted Ford Model T automobile chassis.  American sponsored Ford Model Ts were sent over as a chassis and the passenger box was a kit strapped to the top for assembly in France. The Tin Lizzie quickly became a favorite of the drivers. Many of the same schools and towns that provided ambulance units also raised funds to provide an ambulance for their unit.  The University of Missouri proudly put forth one of these units.  All financed their own uniforms and transportation to France.  The volunteer drivers of the AAFS were considered non-combatants and therefore could remain American citizens but were limited to medical transport.  This ¾ scale replica is based on a 1915 Tin Lizzie and is built on a golf cart chassis for the 100th Anniversary of WWI by Dawn Patrol Members John O’Conner and Dave Laur.

 

Ferret armored car (wheeled armored fighting vehicle)          Top of Page

The Ferret armored car, also commonly called the Ferret Scout car, is a British armored fighting vehicle designed and built for reconnaissance purposes. The Ferret was produced between 1952 and 1971 by the UK company, Daimler. It was widely adopted by regiments in the British Army as well as Commonwealth countries throughout the period. This vehicle is owned by Dr. Wes Stricker and is based in Columbia, MO.
Weight: 3.7 Tons Engine: Rolls Royce 130 hp Speed: 58 mph